Build your own backyard bunker!

Martin’s project began very simply: he went into his backyard and dug a massive hole eight feet deep.

At this point, you can bet Martin’s neighbors were a little confused. If he was building a pool, he didn’t seem to be in any rush to lay the foundations or build up walls.

In fact, the next step in Martin’s plan was to drop a 20-foot long shipping container into the hole.

The handy homeowner had bought the container for about $3,000 online (because these days you can get pretty much everything online).

The only change Martin made to the container was adding a door to one end. Otherwise, it was exactly like any other container you would find on a freighter ship.

Over the next few months, Martin added a sewage pump, concrete steps, and a sturdy metal frame to his creation.

Once a weatherproof concrete frame was added around the staircase and over the metal roof, it became easier to guess what Martin had in mind.

Yes, in a throwback to the heart of the Cold War, Martin built his own backyard bunker.

But instead of a fallout shelter, his container is a makeshift wine cellar, perfect for storing home brews and an impressive bottle collection.

If you want to get a sense of the project step-by-step, Martin has condensed the entire thing into a very cool video.

Once you see all the work that went into his cellar, you’ll agree that Martin is the king of DIY.

Something a little more comfortable

Martin isn’t the first person to repurpose a shipping container like this. These sturdy and cheap metal boxes are great for all kinds of projects.

One company ships tiny homes built inside these containers on demand, and you can buy them online.

They don’t look as cozy as other tiny homes, but the $36,000 price tag is hard to beat.

If you’re handy, like shipbuilder Evans was, you can even design and build your own tiny container home.

Since his job takes him all over the world, Evans didn’t touch the outside of the container. That allows him to transport it like a regular container, so his little slice of home moves with him.

But open up the crate and his bachelor pad, nicknamed “Fartshaven,” is surprisingly cozy.

It has all the amenities of an apartment – including a bathroom and working kitchen – but doesn’t seem cramped despite the small floor space.

With cozy hardwood floors and wall paneling, the apartment actually feels like you’re on a ship from the inside.

Tiny home
Evans designed the apartment to join with other containers.Living Big – YouTube

Evans has big plans for his design, and some creative improvements in mind.

Tiny home
Evans’ model of his next addition.Living Big

With another room in a separate container, he’ll be able to ship an entire home like Lego pieces, and snap them together anywhere he likes.

It’s not my idea of comfort, but for a wandering soul like Evans it must be just right.